Silver Nanoparticles as a Prospective Nematicide against Meloidogyne incognita in Sugarbeet Fields

Authors

  • Gohar I.M.A. Department of Sugar Crops Disease and Pests, Sugar Crops Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619, Egypt.
  • Abeer S. Yassin Department of Sugar Crops Disease and Pests, Sugar Crops Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619, Egypt.
  • H.M. El-Sharnoby Department of Plant Physiology and Chemistry, Sugar Crops Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619, Egypt.
  • K.M. Agami Department of Agricultural Practices Research, Sugar Crops Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619, Egypt.
  • Walaa R. Abdelghany Department of Maize and Sugar Crops Diseases, Plant Pathology Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619, Egypt.

Keywords:

Management, Meloidogyne, nematicide, root-knot nematode, silver nanoparticle, sugarbeet

Abstract

Convinced Nematodes are widespread soil-borne organisms found in sugarbeet cultivation areas, particularly in Egypt's Nubaryia district, and they cause significant economic damage to sugarbeet crops. The root-tie nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) is a typical plant-parasitic nematode found in sugarbeet. Substance the executive's choices for root-knot nematode the board in sugarbeet are defective (both biologically and financially), and novel nematicidal assets are expected to resolve this perplexing issue. The reason for this study was to evaluate the viability of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) as a nematicidal dedicated against M. incognita in lab, outdoors pots experiments, and field settings. Arrangement A was chosen for dissolving AgNO3 in deionized water to deliver Ag-NPs. Arrangement B is coded for solvency. At the point when second juveniles (J2) were presented to AgNP in water at gradual concentrations, over 95%, of nematodes became inactive in 6 hours or less. After 4 and 2 days of exposure, sugarbeet and soil composite samples infested with M. incognita were treated with 150 g/ml AgNP, reducing the number of J2 in the soil, after 4 and 2 days of exposure, by 92% and 82%, respectively, when compared to untreated soil samples. An AgNP field experiment was conducted on a sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris, var. Sahar) field that was previously infested with M. incognita. Fortnightly application of 90.4 mg/m2 of AgNP improved sugarbeet quality in one year and reduced galls development in the roots in two years, while avoiding phytotoxicity. The use of AgNP did not significantly reduce the quantity of M. incognita J2 in plots throughout the growing season. The
laboratory assays confirmed that AgNP's had nematicidal effect, and the field evaluation demonstrated its effectiveness in mitigating M. incognita damage to sugarbeet.

Published

10.01.2024